Sasebo

Hash House Harriers

Guide

 

written by Sphincter

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Introduction:

Hashing has its origins in the competitive cross-country paper chases such as those of the Thames Hare and Hounds Club in England founded in 1869. The course is set by a "hare" who leaves a biodegradable trail marked in flour, paper, and chalk for the pack of "hounds" a.k.a. "harriers" to follow. In 1938, Albert Gispert, a.k.a. "G" and a few of his friends started the original Hash House Harriers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, similar to the previous competitive paper chases with a few important changes. The object was to have a bit of exercise and some refreshment afterwards. A few of the original members played rugby and so were somewhat fit, others such as Albert Gispert were not so athletic; so the idea was to enjoy a noncompetitive experience together where slow and fast didn’t handicap each other. This was accomplished by the ingenious invention of the "check" a.k.a. "intersection", where the trail stops and the fast hounds must find the trail's continuation, therefore giving the slower hounds a chance to catch up. This guide is an introduction to the traditions of the Sasebo Hash House Harriers which are adopted mostly from the traditions of the Okinawa Hash House Harriers.

Chapter 1: Finding The True Trail

Section 1: Hare Marks

Only the hares are allowed to use the marks described in this section. The pack has its own marks described in section 3. If you are new to hashing, it is important that you study the hare marks first, since they will keep you from getting lost on the trail.

Symbol Description
This "Start Arrow" indicates the direction of the Start. Often the exact Start location may not be well known to everyone so it is typical to announce a prominent landmark known to everyone where these marks will lead you into the Start. Hares should have these marks in place at least one hour prior to the start of the hash.
This "Start" indicates the Start. When "Hares Away" is announced, the hares will start setting the trail from where they have marked Start. The pack will wait for 12 minutes after "Hares Away" before walking, and 15 minutes before running.
"Chad" is shredded paper and/or flour. This "Chad" indicates the hare has been here to mark the trail. Chad often leads you along the true trail but not always; those tricky hares may try to lead you astray with the use of chad on a false trails as well. Except after a map or an intersection, chad will typically be marked every 10 to 25 meters depending on the terrain and weather conditions. The pack should not have a hard time finding the chad when on trail.
This "True Trail" indicates you are on the true trail and the direction where the true trail continues. Make sure that the number of cross hashes is three, as sometimes those clever hares will try to lead you astray with arrows that look like a true trail arrow, perhaps with two or four cross hashes.
This "Check Back" indicates that you need to search in the direction from which you came to find the continuation of the true trail, perhaps as far back as the last "".
This "Check Back Five" indicates that you need to check back in the direction from which you came to the "fifth" chad and find the continuation of true trail from there. Other numbers can also be used, such as "CB7" for check back to the "seventh" chad, etc.
This "Intersection" a.k.a. "Check" indicates that you are on the true trail but not the direction where the trail continues. To find the continuation of true trail, you need to search in all directions, sometimes even in the direction from which you came. You should find trails marked in chad, within 50 to 100 meters of the intersection. After finding a trail in chad you should look for either a "BT" or a "" within the next 100 to 300 meters.
This "Intersection" drawn with three piles of chad in a triangular pattern is identical in meaning to "" drawn in chalk and is usually used where marking in chalk is not possible.
This "Bad Trail" a.k.a. "Back Track" indicates that you are on a false trail and need to return to the last intersection to search in another direction for the true trail.
This "Bad Trail" drawn with three parallel lines of chad is identical in meaning to the "BT" drawn in chalk and is usually used where marking in chalk is not possible.
This "Map" indicates where to go to find the continuation of the true trail. While following the map, there will likely be no trail markings until you reach the location indicated in the map. In some cases, drawing a map may be confusing, so Maps sometimes use written directions instead, for example:
    Map
    Go right at the next traffic light
    Go left at Mc Donald's.
This "No Blow" indicates that you should be quiet in this area, no shouting or blowing your whistle. The hares use this to indicate sensitive areas such as near hospitals and police stations where making noise would certainly get us into trouble.
This "Blow OK" indicates that you have passed through the sensitive area and may continue to shout and blow your whistle to indicate to the rest of the pack how you are doing on trail.
This "Beer Near" indicates that you are within 100 to 500 meters of the Finish. Make sure it is spelled correctly sometimes those sadistic hares will misspell this intentionally when you still have quite a long way to go.
This "Finish" indicates that you have completed the hash. Have a beer or a soda and discuss the trail with your fellow hashers and prepare for "Down Downs". As with "Beer Near", make sure those sadistic hares spelled "Finish" correctly or you may stop too soon and find yourself waiting in the wrong place.

Section 2: Pack Shouting And Whistles

The pack uses whistles, shouting, and pack marks to communicate with each other and work as a team in pursuit of the hares. You should shout or blow your whistle whenever you see a hare mark to signal the rest of the pack what it is that you have found.

When... Shout or Whistle
When chad is spotted you should shout "On On" or blow two short toots on your whistle.
When the true trail is spotted you should shout "True Trail!" or blow three long toots on your whistle.
or When intersection is spotted you should shout "Intersection!" or blow three long toots on your whistle.
or When bad trail is spotted you should shout "Bad Trail!".
"Are You?" When you want to know how the pack ahead of you is doing, typically at an intersection, shout the question, "Are You"?
"Checking!" When asked "Are You?" you should shout "Checking!" if you are looking for trail.
"Bad Trail!" When asked "Are You?" you should shout "Bad Trail!" if you found a hare's "BT" mark.
"On Three!" When asked "Are You?" and you have seen chad but have not seen either a "BT" or a "", you should shout "On" and the number of chad seen since the intersection, for example "On Three!" for three chad seen.
"On Trail!" When asked "Are You?" you should shout "On Trail!" if you are on trail.

Section 3: Pack Marks

The pack carries chalk in order to mark trail for the benefit of those in the pack behind them. It is very important that nobody in the pack draws any of the marks described above in Section 1 which are reserved for the hares. Once you understand the following pack marks you should carry chalk and mark trail.

Symbol Description
This "Pack Arrow" indicates the direction where the leaders in the pack went. Typically seen marked on or near intersections to indicate a direction which was searched while looking for true trail.
This "No Trail Pack Arrow" indicates that someone searched in this direction and came back to the intersection to add the "?" to their pack arrow because they did not find either of the hare's "BT" or "" mark.
This "Bad Trail Pack Arrow" indicates that someone searched in this direction and came back to the intersection to add the three parallel lines in front of their pack arrow because they saw the hare's "BT" mark. Do not use this mark unless you actually see the hare's "BT" mark in this direction.
This "On On Pack Arrow" indicates that someone searched in this direction and found the "". Typically someone who finds the true trail will want to keep going along true trail and will not want to return to the intersection to mark their pack arrow. Usually someone else back at the intersection will do this for them.
This "Short Cut Pack Arrow" indicates that someone discovered a shortcut.
This "Caught Hare" indicates that the pack snared a hare at 1437. To catch a hare, simply touch the hare while the hare is carrying chalk or chad and say "Caught Hare". If a hare is snared the pack must immediately release the hare and wait for 5 minutes to give the hare a chance to finish marking trail.

Section 4: Review Of Pack Marking For Intersections


Frame 1

Frame 2

Frame 3

Frame 4

Frame 5

Frame 6

Frame 7
 

Frame 1: The only marks are from the hare.
Frame 2: A harrier reaches the intersection and chooses to go left and marks his pack arrow.
Frame 3: The harrier returns to the intersection after not finding any trail and marks a "?" in front of his pack arrow.
Frame 4: The harrier chooses to check another direction and mark his pack arrow.
Frame 5: The harrier returns to the intersection after finding a "BT" and marks three parallel lines in front of his pack arrow.
Frame 6: The harrier has chosen to go in another direction and mark his pack arrow.
Frame 7: Someone else at the intersection marked "On On" after hearing the harrier shout, "True Trail".

If you can understand this review, then you will have no trouble figuring out which way to go at intersections.

Chapter 2: Hash Traditions

Section 1: The Hash Start

The Hash Master as the master of ceremonies will make several standard announcements to the pack at the "Start" and "Finish" as we observe our Hash Traditions.

"Gather Round For Announcements": Once the pack has formed into a circle, the Hash Master announces upcoming events and any special information or instructions about today’s trail to the pack.

"Let's Meet Today's Hares": The Hash Master introduces today’s hares to the pack.

"Hares Away": The Hash Master releases the hares to start marking the trail and the members of the pack blow their whistles.

"Chalk Talk For First Through Fifth Time Hashers": The Religious Advisor explains the marks to new hashers.

"Gather Round For Hash Aerobics": The Song Meister leads the pack in singing the song Father Abraham.

"Let's Go": 12 minutes after hares away, the members of the pack will hear this announcement, blow their whistles, and start walking.

"Hounds Away": 15 minutes after hares away, the members of the pack will hear this announcement, blow their whistles, and start running.

Section 2: The Hash Trail

The Hash trail is meant to be interesting and fun. The hares take time to plan their trails through interesting terrain, so each hash is different, fun, and exciting. The location of the Finish is a closely guarded secret and is only found when the pack works together to follow the trail, a fun game for everyone. The Finish will generally be within a 15 minutes walk from the Start, otherwise the hares will provide for transportation back to the Start. The trail will usually take from 45 to 90 minutes for the pack to complete over a distance of 6 to 10 km. On a well planned trail it is not unusual for the pack of slow and fast hounds to stick together with the hare’s clever placement of loops and intersections to slow down the fast hounds which allows the slower hounds to keep pace.

Section 3: The Finish And Down Downs

"Gather Round For Down Downs": Once the pack has formed into a circle, the Hash Master starts the Down Downs, ceremonial recognition of the accomplishments of our harriers on today’s trail. We sing some important songs during the down downs which are included in Appendix A.

"And The Hares, And The Hairs...": The pack starts singing to bring the Hares into the circle to recognize them for setting a great (or not so great) trail with a Down Down.

"Bring Forth The Virgins": The virgins are brought into the circle to be introduced to the pack. The virgins are asked, each in turn, "What is your name, and who made you come?". After introductions are completed, the virgins do their first down down and their initiation into the Hash is now complete. The virgins are then instructed to bring a whistle to their next hash.

"Headbands": Headbands are awarded to those celebrating their 10th, 25th, 50th, 69th, 75th, 100th, 125th, 150th, 169th, 175th, 200th, etc. hashes and they of course do a down down.

"Super Hares": Those who have hared ten trails are awarded the esteemed title of Super Hare and they of course do a down down.

"Violations": Those who violate our sacred traditions are brought into the center of the circle and suffer through embarrassment and public ridicule by the pack, and they of course do a down down. If that hasher does not yet have a name, whoever brought them drinks with them for not properly instructing them in our traditions.

Caught Hares: If one of the hares gets caught, they all do a down down.

Trail Violations: If one of the hares marks or sets the trail improperly, or one of the hounds marks the trail with a hare only mark, they do a down down.

Abandoning Your Virgin On Trail: You are responsible for those you bring to the hash so teach them well. The first hash should always be a fun and rewarding experience for our virgins so they will come back. Do not abandon your virgins on trail, keep them with you, so you will have an opportunity to explain the trail markings.

New Shoes: A tradition borrowed from the idea of christening a new vessel with a bottle of champagne just before its launching into the open waters. We christen our new shoes.

Sitting On The Holy Down Down Cooler: We never sit on the holy down down cooler as it contains our holy water and sitting on it would be a desecration.

Use of Nerd Names: We always refer to our fellow hashers by their proper hash name, unless they have not been given one yet.

"Gather Round To Name Our Fifth Time Hashers": Those who have completed five hashes are invited to tell us a little something about what they do in real life. After their introductions are complete, they are sent away from the circle. Anyone who already has a hash name gathers into the naming circle where secret deliberations on what names to give take place. If for some reason someone is dissatisfied with their hash name they may request a name change.

"Other business": Those who wish to make an announcement has the opportunity at this time, perhaps they are hosting a party and the hash is invited or they need to wear long pants and gloves at the next hash they are haring, etc.

"Closing Announcements": The location of the On On and the schedule of upcoming hashes is announced.

"Give Me A Note, Hmmmmmmmm...": The pack sings the international hash song.

"Headband And Whistle Check": The pack blows their whistles to make sure they still work and we see that those who are supposed to have their headbands and whistles do. If there are any violators they of course do a down down.

"The Hash Is Ended, ...": The pack cleans up the trash in the down down area and proceeds back to the start to get their car and go to the On On if they wish.

Section 4: The On-On

Much like the original "Hash House", it is traditional that after the hash, the harriers will gather for some socializing at the On On. The hares plan an On-On at a local restaurant, their house, a picnic in the park, or somewhere usually within a 5 minute drive or walk from the start. The On On is a great chance to meet our fellow hashers and discuss the wonders of hashing.

 

 

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